Heavy rains bring Mumbai to a halt; the future predictions don’t look promising

Mumbai, the city of dreams, is staring at its worst deluge, the one that hit it in 2005, with heavy rains leaving many parts of the city flooded.

Incessant rains hit Mumbai for the fourth straight day on Tuesday, flooding vast areas of the city, and the ‘city that never sleeps’ is facing a nightmare that has affected the trains and flights services in the Maharashtra capital, along with bringing a halt to the ever busy Mumbai roads.

The future predictions don’t look promising either. Weather officials have predicted very heavy rains will continue all through Tuesday and heavy rains on Wednesday in the city. The Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation (BMC) asked people to be cautious, saying the intensity of rains is set to increase in the next few hours. The civic body also urged people to stay indoors.

Flights were delayed by at least 15-20 minutes from India’s second-busiest airport. There were 5 go arounds and 2 diversions till 11:30 am. All major airlines have advised flyers to enquire before heading to the airport.

Traffic jams were reported on all major arterial roads in Mumbai, including the Eastern and Western Express Highway, Sion-Panvel highway and LBS Marg as the rains continued since last night.

Water-logging was reported in low-lying areas of Parel and Sion. A tree fell on the busy Saat Rasta road, affecting road traffic.

Narendra Modi spoke to CM Devendra Fadnavis and assured Centre’s support to the state.

He took to twitter and urged Mumbaikars to take all precautions, follow directives issued by the authorities.

According to an official from the BMC’s Disaster Management Cell, “There have been reports of waterlogging in Dadar, Andheri, Worli, Kurla, and Sakinaka, among other areas. We have received 20 cases of a tree falling and one of a wall collapse.”

Despite the heavy downpour, no untoward incident has been reported so far,” said the official.

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